DESIGNING FOR
THE THIRD INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

SUMMER SCHOOL IN DIGITAL FABRICATION
AND INTERACTION DESIGN
9-27 JULY 2012


DIGITAL FABRICATION
COSTANTINO BONGIORNO, www.vectorealism.com
ENRICO BASSI, www.fablabtorino.org
Week 1 / 9 – 13 July 2012

Digital fabrication
Photo by Marius Watz

Overview
Digital fabrication refers to the translation of digital designs into physical objects using computer-controlled machine. While the technologies used for digital fabrication have been common in fast prototyping and industrial production, only recently they have become accessible for small-scale productions. Designers’ and makers’ communities can now take advantage from these powerful technologies and use prototyping machinery and tools such as laser cutters, 3d printers and 3D modelling software to design innovative products and systems.

Goals
Goal of the workshop is to learn about digital fabrication practices and processes and how to create digitally designed objects that can be fabricated. After an introduction about digital fabrication, participants will learn:

- how to use the basic functionalities of Rhinoceros, the most used 3D and 2D drawing software, to create an objects);
- how to design and fabricate a small object of low or intermediate complexity, to manage curves, solids and elementary mechanical solutions like snap fits, fasteners, bosses, etc.
- how to design in 2D and 3D objects and how to prepare a file for a laser cutter or a 3D print;
- how to manage computer-controlled machinery and to apply techniques of 3D printing, laser cutting and engraving.

During the workshop a library of Rhinoceros examples will be used for creating digital objects. All participants will develop a final project according to a specific theme.

 


TYPOGRAPHY, COMPUTATION AND FABRICATION
GIORGIO OLIVERO AND FABIO FRANCHINO, www.todo.to.itWeek 2 / 16 – 20 July 2012

Typography, Computation, Fabrication
Picture by Giorgio Olivero

Overview
What are the opportunities of computation as a physical process? How can we bypass the bottleneck of traditional, commercial graphic software through generative strategies applied to type? How can we explore the tangible qualities of type beyond the conventional notions of paper and screen? This workshop is devoted to the practice of amplifying typography in tactile, exciting and novel ways. Participants will be taught how to program using Processing and will learn how to write a code to generate shapes, structures and surfaces that can be digitally fabricated.

Goals
Goals of the workshop are to provide participants with the fundamental knowledge of Processing in order to design generative typographical solutions and to explore digital fabrication techniques. Participants will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to play with glyphs, by analyzing and reshaping them through iterative processes, finding out new shapes through the use of computational geometry, autonomous agents and rule-based systems. In the second phase, the goal is to produce hybrid type –part digital, part physical– by using fast prototyping techniques such as laser cutting and 3d printing. Previous experience with scripting languages and digital fabrication technologies is a bonus, but not a requirement.


PHYSICAL AND WEARABLE COMPUTING WITH ARDUINO
MASSIMO BANZI, www.arduino.cc
ZOE ROMANO, www.openwear.org
Week 3 / 23 – 27 July 2012

Physical and werable computing with Arduino
Photo by Paul Downey

Overview
Physical computing encompasses the design of interactive physical systems through the use of software and hardware that can sense and respond to the analog world. Applications of physical computing are becoming spread and, thanks to technology miniaturization and fast prototyping, it is now possible to experiment solutions of interactive and wearable objects that can be digitally fabricated.

Goals
Goal of the workshop is the design and prototyping, through the Arduino platform, of objects that sense, interpret and react to the real world and that can be wearable and digitally fabricated.
During the first phase of the workshop, notions of physical and wearable computing will be provided together with an introduction to the Arduino platform and to digital fabrication techniques.

In the second phase, workshop activities are split in two different tracks:
- the physical computing track, held by Massimo Banzi, will focus on the design and prototyping of digitally fabricated interactive objects.
- the wearable computing track, held by Zoe Romano, will explore the world of digital fabrication applied to open source fashion and, in particular, to the implementation of digitally fabricated accessories featured by interactive behaviors.

The workshop requires some rudimentary understanding of programming that can be acquired in the previous week (Typography, computation and fabrication). Applicants without previous experience are warmly welcome to contact us for getting a list of books for reference

Documentation
See the documentation issued after the workshop:

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